The Innovators: an interview with author, M.G. Unger

After a 5 month hiatus, The Innovators, an indie artist interview series, is back with the indie author of Divided and Enhanced 2124…….

Introduce yourself

My name is M.G. Unger. I was born, raised, and still currently live in Florida. After school, I moved away from most of my family to be with friends. After a long chain of dumb choices, I finally made a good one, I met my wife. Through our love, my destiny was fulfilled.

What I am is a father first. Above all the multitude of cogs, gears, and unpredictable events, being a dad is what I am most proud of. There is no award or accomplishment that will ever surpass this feat. It took me and my wife a long while and we had to overcome health issues to become parents to three wonderful children. As life often does, there was/is some sideways issues and I turned to writing to cope.

When and why did you start writing?

I always wrote poems or short stories throughout my life for fun. Never in my dreams I thought I would write a book, but here I am about to release my second book out into the wild. Because of complications with one of our daughters I became helpless mentally and was even suicidal. Talking through the issues with my wife, I mentioned in passing about a story I was thinking about. My wife instantly encouraged me just to write it down. Everyday since 2017, I have been writing. Our daughter is not cured, but she is doing way better, but regardless, I cannot stop writing. It is my therapy.

Who or what inspires your writing / creativity?

I grew up in the golden age of cartoons. He-Man, GI-Joe, and later in life Batman: The Animated Series. Along with toons, I enjoyed reading science fiction and playing video games. Regardless of the media format, the thing that drew me into any of it was the stories. I especially am always drawn to tales that are unique, the unusual, or a trope that bends the formula.

Tell me about Divided and Enhanced

Divide and Enhanced is my premier novel series. It is set in the future and is an adventure about multiple factions with different strengths, powers, and goals trying to save or destroy one another. The series is told through multiple protagonists and oftentimes the same events overlap but are seen through different character’s eyes. High tech, artificial intelligence, and robots? Check, check check. It is obviously born from my favorite genre, science fiction. The idea came from a personal need to create a character based on our daughter who begins weak but builds strength from that weakness. It was/is very fun writing this series. All the characters I have created so far argue in my headspace all the time and I absolutely love it.

What are your upcoming projects?

Ah yes, I do have other projects in various levels of progression. In order to never get stuck, I have multiple stories or books to jump back and forth on. The furthest along is on chapter five of the first draft. This one will probably be the next book I release after Divided and Enhanced: The Fall. It is going to be a fun ride, but in a different way then the DE series. Mix a reality game show with time traveling and the multiverse and you’ll get a general idea of what that book is about. I have a few other ideas I have began writing in addition to that one.

One of these I want to hold off on until I have a few more books on the shelf. It is a fascinating concept that I don’t want to share just yet. The reason being is because I’m not ready. I want to be sure my skills are honed enough to give the project the flourish and craftsmanship it deserves. It is going to be a large project and like all of my other tales, I think I’m more excited to write them than I think my biggest fan is to read them. Oh, and FYI, my biggest fan is my wife and no one will ever take her from that slot. I wouldn’t be half of who I am without her never-ending relentless support and love.

What challenges do you face as an indie author? What advantages do you have as an indie?

Being an independent author has no challenges at all. I mean not anymore than anything else in life. I wish for once, my talents would be put up against something in life that is just plainly simple. Nothing is, so I enjoy what I do. Yes, sarcasm aside, writing books as an independent author is extremely tough. Just because it is tough doesn’t mean it is rewarding. First and above all, I control the time table. Being able to control time is phenomenal! Though that has it’s dangers as well and without enough drive I can easily get stuck in a whirlwind of edits and revisions that will spiral on forever if I let it. Marketing is by far the hardest thing to me. I’ve been studying and researching, knowledge is power and boy do I need some power in that department. Haha!

What is your greatest writing achievement so far? What are you still working towards?

I did it! I wrote a book! Many people, in fact, inaccurate estimations state that nearly 98 point Q percent of the entire population says that they are going to write a book, but only a slim number much less than that actually do. The point being, I feel really special that I can look at my shelf every day and see amongst my books, one with my name on it. It really is quite an honor to write a book. To be able to string along letters to form worlds is beyond scientific understanding, it is magical. The feeling of accomplishment after creating art in this medium is vast and an unexplainably amazing feeling. I need improvement in all aspects of being a writer. I’m not the best and I never will be the best. All I want to achieve is to be better than what my past self imagined.

Where can readers find you?

Website: https://mgunger6.wixsite.com/website

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/m.g.unger/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mgunger

The Innovators #11 with…The Innovators (aka Interview with the Blog)

Now that The Innovators has ten interviews under its belt and has grown a small (but loyal) audience, it has started to take on a life of its own and has requested that the writer interview It this week. Never being one to turn down an interview request, the writer has obliged. So here we go….

Introduce yourself.

Hi! I’m The Innovators, a weekly interview series that focuses on indie creatives. I came into existence a few months back and since then I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing ten incredibly talented artists, including musicians Gerry Weaver and Preston Bell, writer/poet Jared Kane and indie authors Julia DeBarrioz, Eme Savage, Darren Edden, Billy Middleton, Lee Vockins, RJ Jacobs and Eric Woods.

What drives you, Innovators Blog? What inspires you to do this work?

I’m inspired by creativity! I have an affinity for artists, for their art. I think creation is a human superpower (next to love, of course). Art is a balm to all the hurts of humanity and those who create art need to be supported and encouraged in their continuing quests to bring their imaginings to life. It takes a unique sort of courage to share one’s art, to share those thoughts, feelings, ideas that often come from the darkest, quietest parts of one’s soul and offer it up to the rest of the world for comment or criticism. I wish to play a postive role (albeit a small one) in helping artists, particularly indie authors, to gain exposure and confidence in their work and perhaps themselves too. I want them to know that they are supported, they are heard, they are seen, they are important.

What’s the hardest part about being a blog?

Finding readers, finding an audience, for sure, that’s the toughest part! I am just a small platform, with a small voice. Hopefully, over time, more and more people will see my posts and will share it on their platforms and my audience will grow from there. I really want to get the artists I feature out in front of as many eyes as I possibly can.

Upcoming interviews?

Well, I’m excited to have my first indie filmmaker interview coming up next week with Leah Solmaz and after that, two more talented indie authors: CK Shakleton and Patrick D. Kaiser! I am hoping to continue the writer streak into the new year. I think interviews with John Meredith, MG Unger, Jason Rogers, Tanis Justice, Slate Raven, Freddie Ahlin and O.S. Williams would be cool.

Where can readers find you?

They can find me every Wednesday right here on this blog (www.melanie-ever-moore.com) and on Melanie Ever Moore’s Instagram @m.ever.moore and on her Facebook writer’s page: Realign My Stars (speaking of which, she should probably change that name soon. I mean really, it should have been changed to “The Innovators” months ago….)

Thanks, Innovators Blog!!

The Innovators #8 with….author/poet Jared Kane

This week, I’m excited to feature my favourite author, Jared Kane. His novels (Decline, Mya and The Underside of Wars) are some of the most thought-provoking and beautifully written books that I have come across since my university days studying English lit. He is also an incredibly talented poet who crafts some of the most profoundly dark and stirring poems found on social media today. Read on to find out more…

Introduce yourself and your work.

I’m Jared Kane, a writer of books, short stories, and poetry. I’ve had poetry published by both online and print publications. My novels are currently self-published, and are regrettably in the corner, unwilling to raise their hands to draw attention to themselves. They don’t want to be noticed at this party because they make the most noise, but because they are the most beautiful and profound thinkers in the group. Sometimes those types stay in the corner and are never discovered.

Explain the significance of your Instagram handle, Whirlpool of Crows.

I went through a couple before I landed on this one, and really, I only stuck with this one because it is how many first found me. It’s four syllables of seventeen of a haiku I wrote: a whirlpool of crows / swirls above, justifying / our murderousness. It also features in my first novel, Decline. And I have it tattooed on my arm.

Your first novel, Decline, reads very much like poetry. Tell me why you were inspired to write it like that and why a nameless/anonymous protagonist?

I wanted Decline to differ from all the other post-apocalyptic/dystopian stories out there. I conceived the story before the glut of post-apocalyptic media hit our shelves and screens, but by the time I finished it, a lot of these stories were already out there. So, I took inspiration from a Salman Rushdie book I read once—I’m not sure if I even liked the actual book that much, but the manner in which he wrote it, it felt like you could pull out any random paragraph, arrange it like a poem, and a beautiful poem it would be. At least, that’s how I felt at the time. So, I set about writing Decline with a different mindset: to couch the story in poetic language.

The nameless protagonist is a bit of a shameless homage to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. Also, the novel is very “stream of consciousness”, like the reader is inside the narrator’s head, hearing what he hears, and seeing what he sees. I feel like his name would be superfluous, and maybe even colour the reader’s impression of him (everyone knows a John, or a Dave, or a Dominic—maybe less so the latter—and if the narrator was “John”, the reader might see their John’s face or hear their John’s features).

Explain the meaning and significance of the quote “Temporis Destruit Omne – Time Destroys Everything” as it applies to your second novel, Mya.

Temporis Destruit Omne is another one of my tattoos now—I hope there’s no Latin scholars out there who pipe in about how terrible my translation is.

Mya is a very intimate book. Without getting into spoilers, “Time Destroys Everything” guides most of what happens in the narrative. It’s a very intimate belief and feeling of mine: it doesn’t matter what you build, what you create, who you become, it will all crumble to nothing in time.

There is no such thing as history and future, past and present—aside from what your senses are perceiving right this moment (itself an interpretation of the mind), everything else is dust or in a state of either becoming dust. A character in Mya proposes the theory of Eternalism, which is a sort of answer to this philosophy. Eternalism is the belief that past, present, and future all exist at once and are equally real (to put it mildly, this is the nutshell version, and I’m absolutely not an expert). This is reassuring in a way: all those times you had, or wish you’d had, they’re all out there still and possible, even if you will never return to them again.

The Underside of Wars protagonist, Matthew Talbot, is a writer frustrated with the state of the literary world and its inability to appreciate his work or give him his “break.” How much of that comes from your own experience as an indie author?

Underside is maybe my most personal book. This will be a very vulnerable answer.

The main character grapples with a lot of things I do, thinks some things I think, feels some things that I feel. Matthew’s experience does reflect my personal experience to some degree when it comes to personality shortcomings and substance abuse. He’s a bit of a cipher. While Matthew is supremely confident in his abilities, that confidence is so shaky that he’s fundamentally unable to accept being unsuccessful, or for success to look different than he always imagined. I am very confident in my ideas, my writing, and what I’ve created. And it can be very hard to accept being passed over. It’s all the more devastating to accept the possibility that I may never be successful (insofar as I define “success”). If that comes to pass, what else is there? There’s a lot more plot in Matthew’s journey, but those quandaries and principles are pretty central.

You’ve described your three novels as a trilogy. With different characters and storylines, how do they fit in/ mesh together as a trilogy? Do they need to be read in a specific order?

I call them my Apocalypse Trilogy. It’s more like they exist in the same universe, and fall somewhere on the same timeline. There’s no direct connection between them except for some easter eggs in Underside that point to it taking place a certain amount of time after Mya. If there was an order, it would be Mya, Underside, then Decline. They absolutely do not have to be read in that order. Though that’s not a bad order in which to read them. A new reader would probably find the language in Mya and Underside more accessible. Then, hopefully after they’ve read those two, they’d be willing to undertake the challenge of reading Decline.

What role does music play in your creative process? What else inspires your creativity? What bands/artists are currently on your writing playlist?

Music is everything to me. Life without music would be food without taste. I have a psychological dependence on music, sort of the way someone can become addicted to gambling: like a gambler feels a shot of dopamine when they pull the slot lever down, so do I feel a surge of dopamine when I hear the music I love.

I always match up a song with what I’m writing. If it’s a sad moment, I play a sad song. If an action sequence, I play a more aggressive song, and so on. I know some writers have difficulty focusing when they’re listening to music, and especially music with lyrics, but I don’t hear the lyrics. All I hear is mood.

In that regard, I have thousands of songs on my writing playlist—it all depends what type of dopamine hit I need at the time! For example, Decline is a quiet, sad, philosophical post-apocalyptic novel, so my playlist for that book included a lot of Lycia for the quiet, sad moments. For the more heartbreaking moments, the playlist would become more aggressively despondent, like Psyclon Nine’s “Under the Judas Tree”. Mya was very much influenced by songs from Yendri, while Underside is more raw, and had music from Amenra and Black Mare (see Black Mare’s “Ingress to Form”). Right at this moment in the block universe, I’m cycling through those three playlists (I still keep a separate playlist for each book on iTunes) as I write these answers.

What else inspires my creativity? Maybe everything, maybe nothing. I’m usually most inspired when I feel a lugubrious emptiness. It’s a profound need that feels deeply hollow. Ironically, it’s difficult to write at those times, because my mind will conjure up the same words and lines over and over. Instead, I’m most productive during times of (and I’m paraphrasing . . . someone . . . I can’t remember who, and I don’t remember the quote well enough to search it) sober reflection on past inspiration.

I’m sure you’re the cosmic love-child of dead poets. Who do you think they are ? What writing talents have you inherited from each of them?

I love this question. Anything that makes me turn around and consider my bookshelves is welcome. It’s like returning to nature after the city.

I’ll say William Wordsworth and Thomas Hardy, which is starting right at the beginning. From Wordsworth, I gained a sense of wonder at nature and a feeling for romanticism that is much more vast than our current crass concept of “romance”. From Thomas Hardy, I inherited a dark and tragic outlook. One is basically a response to the other. Hardy probably continues to have the most influence on my writing. His books can be one thing for 300 pages, and then deliver a gut punch out of nowhere in the last chapter (or last two pages in the case of The Woodlanders) that makes you completely re-evaluate your feelings about the entire book.

What do you hope readers will take away from your work? Do you prefer they read your novels or your poems or both? If they only read one of your books, which one would you most recommend?

I hope that my work evokes an emotional response from readers. The best books I’ve read, I’ll put down and feel different afterwards. The light will be a different warmth, and everything around me will look a little different than it did before. Sometimes this feeling lasts a few hours, a few days, sometimes it’s forever. I want my writing to land on that spectrum for readers. Honestly, as I veer back to the question of “success” that came up several questions back, that is true success. If I can make a reader feel that way, then let the rest of the chips fall where they may.

If I had to choose, I’d rather my readers read my novels. But I don’t write long-form poetry, so read both! Depending on the reader, they might want to start with Underside or Mya because they may go down easier to start.

Where can readers find you?

Readers can find me on Instagram @whirlpool_of_crows, where I post poems and other blurbs, while The Underside of Wars, Mya and Decline are all available on Amazon.

Thanks, Jared!!

Go check out his books…

The Innovators with…..author Eme’ Savage

Introduce yourself and your books.

I am Eme Savage author of The Genesis Chronicles. I write soulful fantasy with mysticism, magic, and mayhem. “Echoes of the Gidat” is my debut novel about a King with unnatural powers, the genocide of the Gidat, and a boy who is the subject of the Third Prophecy. “Tetarul Parallel” is the second book in the series about a young woman with a dark past who comes into possession of a magically enhanced book which will show her the role she is to play in the Prophecy. I also have a short story called “Elegy of the Gidat” which is also part of the Genesis Universe.

Tell me about The Genesis Chronicles: when was its “genesis” and where do you think the story/world/characters came from? What inspired them? What draws you to them?

I love that! There are two timelines that are woven together throughout the series. The Genesis Timeline is the one that came to me first. I grew up on 80 acres of woods and farmland. There is a crik that ran through our property. We would go down there and look for fossils and artifacts. I imagined what it might have been like for the first people who lived here and the story ran from there.

The Omega Timeline came later. The characters took on a life of their own, as they often do. I am drawn to really soulful, philosophical tales that focus on the idea that there is something bigger than ourselves at work. Each story is part of a larger arc but has a theme within them that pertained to a certain time in my life. “Echoes” is about the loss of innocence and finding your purpose. “Tetarul” is about knowing your worth and overcoming trauma. I’m still working out the main themes for my current WIP, but I wanted to bring my own voice as a person with a disability to the table. I am drawn to complex characters mostly because I’m a complex character. Epic fantasy is so often about good vs evil, but the reality is there are shades of gray in everyone. The villain believes they are the hero of their own story, and the heroes aren’t always pure with their intentions. I’m drawn to characters who make mistakes, have insecurities, and they all at the end of the day want to be seen for who they really are. 

As for the world? Worldbuilding is relaxing. I can get lost in developing topography, culture, language, and history for hours. I put a quote from the various books that exist in this world and the beginning of each chapter. I would love to read the Tome of Torcici. It’s quoted quite often. I’ll let you know when I write it. I’m endlessly researching how prehistoric tech might have worked and how people might have lived in that time period. It feels familiar because it is earth-like, but there are notable differences in the world I created. Magic is real, there are sentient beings other than humans, and there are floating islands. I believe that if you build a good world, that the characters will come from that environment and then the plot will drive itself forward.

Why fantasy? What draws you to write in that genre?

Fantasy provides an unrestricted way to process the world. Mental leaps come when we allow ourselves to imagine the improbable or the impossible. I end up in the most interesting places when I allow my mind to wander. I put myself in other people’s shoes and try to understand where they are coming from and what circumstances led them there. I take complex ideas, and issues and process them through the lens of fantasy. Such reflection has led me to a more positive and peaceful place. Don’t we all do that when we watch shows and read stories? Well, maybe not everything. Sometimes an escape from reality is just that, an escape. And that’s a good thing too. Reality can be too much at times.

What role does creativity play in your life? Besides writing, what other creative pursuits do you pursue? Who or what inspires you?

The act of creation is everything. If I can create in whatever form, then I have a sense of well-being. I have been sewing almost as long as I have been writing. There is something soothing about the feel of fabric, the crinkle of pattern paper, and the detailed work necessary to give the project something unique. I specifically enjoy costume design. I was the costume designer for youth theater programs for five years. I put together over 500 costumes in those years, everything from Hairspray to Addams Family. Right now I’m creating a cosplay of one of my iconic characters, The Lady. I’m posting once a week on Wednesdays showing the process I’m going through to get it ready in time for Halloween. I would say my Ma has a lot to do with my love of costumes. She was not a consummate sewist, but she found ways to make these elaborate costumes. My favorite was when I was a peacock. It was a blue sweater with blue tights. She handstitched peacock feathers to my backside, and to a band on my head, created a beak out of painted cardboard, and put my Da’s yellow farm gloves on my feet.

What is the best part of being an indie author?  What is the most difficult part of being indie for you?  What is the best piece of advice you can give to aspiring indie authors?

The best part is the amount of control I have over my work. I decide how it should look, what the content should be, and how much I want to charge. But the best part is interacting with readers. It feels intimate and wonderful. It tickles me to no end when someone pulls a quote out of my novels and tells me what they got out of it. It surprises me every single time. The worst part right now is marketing. It’s a steep learning curve, but I will find a way to master it like I have all the other parts of the writing process. The best advice I can give to aspiring indie authors is to not compare your work with someone else’s. Comparison is the death of creativity. The only thing you should be comparing your work to is your previous work. We are all at different places in our journey. We should be viewing that as something to aspire to, and not a commentary on how much we have yet to do or that we are somehow lacking. You are doing great! Keep going! You absolutely got this! The writing community is so helpful. Sure there are a few bad apples out there, but for the most part, people are so helpful and encouraging. We need that since writing is such a lonely profession. 

What is your superpower? Do you use it for good or evil?

Connecting ideas and things that don’t seem to connect at first glance. I found I have a knack for predicting the socioeconomic effects of public policy. And yes, I did use it for good. I wrote a series of articles on austerity policies, jobless recoveries, tax policies, monetary and fiscal policies, and the global economy.

What was your favourite childhood book or author? How did it/ they influence as a child? And now as an adult?

This one is easy. Madeleine L’Engle is my all-time most influential author. My 4th-grade teacher read “A Wrinkle in Time” to us and I was hooked. That was when I started writing fantasy and SciFi. I loved how the mystical, fantastical, and scientific would intersect in her world. The Time Quintet is the finest series out there. It was true then and it is true now. She was a true pioneer. Women writing science fiction/fantasy was not that common, and having a female protagonist was even less common. “Many Waters” is my favorite. It is a Noah’s Ark retelling, and that sparked my imagination. I reread the novels years later, and I was stunned at how much her writing influenced my style.

What upcoming projects are you working on? What do you want readers to take away from your books? Where can readers find you?

Right now I’m revising the third novel in my series called “Mirror of Ettek”. It picks up where “Tetarul” leaves off with imminent war on the horizon in the Omega Timeline and the aftermath of the Beast Attack in the Genesis Timeline. Both MCs have endured serious physical injuries and are looking for a way to cope. Sakedos possesses a magically enhanced Mirror. He hopes to glean some significant insight into his own situation by watching Vitos’ story unfold. 

I plan on drafting the Scifi companion novel during NaNoWriMo. It will dovetail into the fantasy series. We will learn more about Etevun, the Gidat Tree, Mercy, and the Voice. I have a working title for it, but we’ll see where it goes. I’m very excited about this idea. 

I want you to think about them long after you put the books down. I want at least one idea in there to stick with you and keep you awake pondering the deeper meaning of life. Every reader has taken something different away from these books, and that is what I find so interesting. People from different walks of life and different parts of the world finding their truth in these pages.

You can find me on Instagram and Twitter under the handle @eme_savage, on Facebook as eme.savage, Goodreads as Eme Savage, and both books can be found here: Amazon.com as an ebook, paperback, and on Kindle Unlimited. 

The Innovators #4 with………Author Billy Ray Middleton, Jr

Introduce yourself.

My name is Billy Ray Middleton Jr. I am the author of ‘The Silhouette’ and do a podcast called ‘Blabbercast.’ I also occasionally do Instagram videos/podcasts @ ‘AuthorBillyRay.’

When and why did you start writing?

I started writing around thirteen, mostly thoughts, feels, poems and things of that nature. I liked playing with words and getting things out when I felt the urge. It’s therapeutic to spill your mind on pages.

What role does creativity play in your life?

Creativity is important for me since there are so many things I won’t experience, so in my own worlds I can experience anything I want. Also, I like going outside of the box and creating a unique style of art, whether it be writing or working with video. I enjoy the term ‘Chaotic Beauty.’

Tell me about The Silhouette: who or what inspired the story and characters and why a Lovecraftian romance?

The Silhouette went through many phases over the years, and as most artistic works, it kind of becomes like a child to you. I had an idea for a girl who was physically damaged but still very sweet through her trauma when she could have easily rejected the world that was cruel to her. I asked myself a question, ‘Is love physical more than anything else?’ I wanted to open the door to a curious question of the word ‘Love’. I wanted to put two characters in a situation where they never saw each other, but were right next to each other where only their words and little ticks were on display. Basically, loving someone 100% for only them, the real them, not the external sexual stuff.

The book fell into the Lovecraftian style since it was the best fit for it. I wasn’t thinking about Lovecraft as an inspiration when I wrote it. The book simply fell into it. I’ve always enjoyed the not-knowing aspect of his works and others who do the Lovecraft thing. Our minds do well with blank slates and mysteries.

When and why did your podcast start? Who or what is featured?

In 2013, me and my closest friends started ‘Blabbercast.’ My best friend really wanted to do one and since I can never shut the F up it seemed right up my alley since I talk a lot. I enjoy a Kevin Smith vibe or Howard Stern. I don’t like filters, I know people think different and speak different in private, I always say ‘Let it out. Act like its the glorious 90’s still. This era of fake-ness is lame.’

Who or what inspires your writing?

I actually hated reading since everything was so wordy and never got to the point. So my first inspiration was to try to take some of that out and write more screenplay-like. I like dialogue, and I use it. I like fun and scenes that move, not blabbering on for ten pages about nonsense. The indie books — (yours did this great, Melanie {awe, thanks Billy}) — moved at a perfect pace; I really have enjoyed those reads without the corporate machine behind them F-ing everything up. In fairness I have read some I liked that were mainstream. I love William Peter Blatty, I thought the Exorcist was mind blowing. George R. R. Martin is great as well. I found the Game of Thrones books pretty quick since he moves it quickly or makes scenes, at the very least, interesting.

Any writing quirks?

I don’t have many quirks. I never have had writers block, I just have the ‘I don’t like it’ thing and I never write to just write, I need it be acceptable to me, and then hopefully a lot of people enjoy it, but I need to enjoy it and have fun, whatever happens after that is meant to be or not.

Best advice for other indie authors?

My best advice is to have fun. Ignore all the BS writing rules. They don’t exist. Period. Have good grammar and ‘Do you’ as they say. Don’t be put in a box. Don’t worry about reviews so much either. I found most people review poorly and are hypocritical. If their favorite author wrote something incognito and they were told it was an indie author, they would be extra harsh on it. The look on their face when they found out it was their favorite author? Mind blown! LOL Obviously reviews are important as is people’s opinions. I just feel people in the literary world are too constrictive. That doesn’t work on me.

What is your spirit animal?

A dog. I don’t know if my explanation will fit in with the spirit animal thing, but when I see a puppy my heart sings. My black heart turns red, and I smile and must pet it. I love them. Their loyalty is far superior to humans and it is true unconditional love.

Favourite author and book?

George R. R. Martin – A Song of Ice and Fire, It’s just such a massive accomplishment and I had so much fun reading those for two-months. His dialogue is just so good, and the imagery is fantastic.

What are your upcoming projects?

The newest novel is on the way. The Nicest Parts of Hell – I am not giving too much away. All I can say is I am going to some strange places. Rockstars, psycho’s, serial killers, and blood and love. A lovely Friday night.

Thanks Billy! Check out The Silhouette on Amazon. A highly recommended read that I really enjoyed!!