My indie milestone

I’ve often read that the average indie author can expect to sell 250 books in their lifetime (or their book’s lifetime). If that’s the case, then I surpassed that milestone this weekend with four sales of my first book, Hope Quest book 1: Blackbird (released May 2019).

Four sales is certainly nothing to write home about, but in this case, it’s just enough to write a blog post about.

In order to get those sales, I tried something new this weekend – I paid for my first ever promotional spot on a mailing list. For $25 I ran a one-day ad with Bargain Booksy to promote my book to their YA audience of email subscribers. I had read a few good reviews and a few not so good reviews, but for $25 I thought it was worth a shot. With a mere four sales in that one day, I certainly didn’t make my money back, but those were the first sales I had had in months (!) and it did push my lifetime sales past that 250 milestone marker that most indie books never surpass, so I took it as a win.

There are some things I will do differently next time (and yes, despite the poor showing, I’ve decided to give it another shot). I’ve since learned that a .99 cent price- point and a better blurb should help boost my results, so cross your fingers for me and Hope!

If you’re interested in trying out a Bargain Booksy promo, here’s some good info to get you started: The Best Way to Promote a Book on Bargain Booksy

If you’ve done a book promo with Bargain booksy or another site, comment or drop me a line (you can email me: melcmoore@hotmail.com) and let me know your results. I’d love to do a fuller, more informative post on this type of advertising in the future.

Other book promo sites can be found here via Written Word

…and if you’re looking for something to read, check out my book, Hope Quest book 1: Blackbird!

Going the distance as an indie writer

It’s so easy to get discouraged as an indie writer. It’s a tough industry! Writing is already a difficult and lonely occupation, but then throw in the business side of marketing and hustling and self-promoting yourself, your brand, your book – and all for maybe a handful of sales to your closest friends and family and maybe half a dozen reviews on Amazon (if you’re lucky!). It’s little wonder why so many throw in the towel after a year or two. It breaks my heart every time I see a writer friend give up on their dreams.

It’s difficult to see, but I get it. I totally get it. I have been there sooooo many times myself that I’ve lost count.

But, here’s the thing about choosing to be an indie: it means playing the long game.

Writing and self-publishing, marketing and promoting, growing our platforms and our readership: it’s a marathon, not a sprint. The end will not be in sight for a long time, but then again, we shouldn’t be looking for an end.

As writers, we should always be writing.

As “authorpreneurs” (“one who creates a written product, participates in creating their own brand, and actively promotes that brand through a variety of outlets” – Urban Dictionary), we should always be learning about and growing our business.

And there should never be an end to that.

Trust me, as someone who has been self-employed for sixteen years, creating and operating five (soon six) businesses, there is still and always will be much to learn – and that is a good thing!

Keep yourself busy enough with the writing and the learning and the growing as an indie and soon you ‘ll find that you won’t have any time to become discouraged.

So, keep going!

Some of my favourite websites for writing/ indie inspiration:

www.brainpickings.org

www.writtenwordmedia.com

www.writepublishsell.com

Upcoming webinars for indie writers

I read recently that being an indie author (“authorpreneur“) is 10% writing and 90% marketing (the blog post that described this is a brutally honest, but absolutely spot-on piece about the indie industry and so worth a read on its own). It’s absolutely true that there is a lot to learn and a lot to do (besides writing your books!) in order to be successful as an indie. Knowing this and wanting to understand the process and help other indies find success, I’ve started this indie inked blog to share resources and supports.

Every week, I will share my round-up of webinars (almost always FREE!) that will be of interest to indies, so here we go……..

Limiting Mindsets Roundtable is a free webinar happening on Tuesday, June 29th as part of my favourite Women in Publishing Summit, an amazing yearly event that is chalked full of info and resources for indies. The webinar will focus on how our own limiting beliefs hold us back from achieving success as authors. There are many more webinars happening with the summit and you can find them all here.

“6 Secrets Every Indie Author Should Know” is a free webinar happening on Tuesday, June 29th with New York Times best-selling author, Alessandra Torre. I came across a post for this one on Facebook and am not familiar with the author, but the topic sounded interesting (obviously), so we’ll see how it goes.

My favourite blog read of the week was: The Top Ten Publishing Industry Trends Every Author Needs to Know in 2020. Some pretty interesting and valuable things to know, especially in regards to social media platforms and organic vs. paid reach.

Next blog post is coming on Wednesday (and every Wednesday!) and will focus on website resources for indies and Saturdays will be dedicated to book reviews and author features. Give my blog a follow and, better yet, sign up for my monthly newsletter for all things indie inked!

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Persistent whispers

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I really didn’t want to do it.  Homeschooling my dyslexic son was on the very bottom of my things I’d like to do in this life list and although my husband and I had already kicked around the idea and I had expressed that maybe I would homeschool him next year, I was really just dragging my feet hoping for something else or someone else to step in and present themselves as the answer to our problems.  The little voice in the back of my head, that persistent little whisper that had been there since my son was two, when I first started to become aware of his language and learning difficulties, the one that always said what I wasn’t willing to admit, told me there was no rescue coming.  It said, “you are all he has.”

I desperately didn’t want to believe it.

And then, six weeks into my son’s grade four year, at yet another school meeting with the teacher, the principal and a myriad of other admins who had simply passed the buck by passing my son through grade after grade, year after year, knowing full well he couldn’t read and not wanting to deal with his recent dyslexia diagnosis (no one at the meeting could even bring themselves to say the word dyslexia outloud -well, except me, who said it constantly and loudly knowing it HAD to be addressed if my son was to have any chance of success in school), the house of cards that had been my son’s inefficient education finally and completely, collapsed.  Through yelling and tears (and not just mine), it was made abundantly clear that no one at the school was willing to help my son in the way that he needed to be helped.  So, my husband and I gave up the fight, we collected our son from his classroom and went home to wage our own battle.

Sitting at the kitchen table with my boy the next morning, knowing that his education was now completely in my hands and my hands only was as scary and daunting as sitting in my dorm room in college away from home for the first time had been.  It was a spine-tingling sort of realization of “Oh my godI’ve done it.  I’m here.  Now what??”

The two years that followed (much like my two years of college) were some of the most challenging, yet rewarding times I’ve ever had the pleasure of going through and growing through – and most importantly, it had the same impact on my son.

During those long hard years of homeschooling / reading remediation, my son went from reading four years behind grade level (that equated to not knowing the alphabet in grade four) to reading at grade level.  He revelled in finally being able to read his Harry Potter books to himself.  I’d listen at his closed bedroom door with tears in my eyes as he carefully and haltingly read outloud.  It tugged at my mommy heartstrings just like hearing his first words and seeing his first steps had done – but moreso because learning how to read (and for me, learning how to teach him to read) had been a steep, steep mountain for both of us to climb.  But, even on my worst days, that persistent little whisper in the back of my head was my constant cheerleader, believing in me and what I was doing even when I wasn’t too sure of anything at all.  “You’re the only one who can and will help him,” it told me, “so keep going!”  So I did.

Two years have passed since I wrapped up homeschooling and put my son back into the school system. He just finished grade 7.  He still has his struggles (and always will) because of his dyslexia, but his reading has continued to improve and stay consistent with his grade level.  I couldn’t be prouder of him, even as that persistent whisper in the back of my head has continued.

“Keep helping,” it has told me for two years now.  “There’s more like him.”

And it’s true.

While homeschooling, so many of my mom friends shared their own frustrations at their child’s poor reading skills and the inability of the school to provide appropriate or effective resources to help and so many came to the same sad conclusion, “I can’t do anything about it.  I’m not self-employed like you are, so I can’t homeschool.”

That was true, too.  Being self-employed as a photographer for the past decade has allowed me to schedule my work around my kids and their needs and I was able to move from full to part time employment in order to homeschool.  But then, the pandemic happened and in March I closed up my studio, thinking it would be temporary, but instead, it offered the silence needed for those whispers to get louder.

 

This summer, I will finish up my Orton-Gillingham certification and will close my photography business.  This fall, I will start a new venture:  Rock Star Readers, a reading tutor service for kids.

Those persistent whispers in my head finally made their way to my heart and now I trust them to lead me where they may.

 

 

My book is FREE today!

The Latest on the Amazon Rainforest Fires(1)

My second novel, Hope Quest book 2: The Lightning, and second installment in my Hope Quest series, is FREE today as an e-book via Amazon!  Find it here!  Cosmic and supernatural, it is a coming of age/fantasy/drama about 14-year-old Hope Quest, an unusual girl who speaks in a whisper but has some strange and powerful abilities to control the stars and birds.  After learning of her origins in book 1: Blackbird and having to deal with unexpected trauma at StarFEST, her group of punk friends helps her navigate her growing abilities, just as a strange, new photography teacher arrives at school with a particularly strong interest in Hope.

Check it out and if you enjoy it, please consider leaving me a review on Amazon. Those reviews are gold for indie authors like me!

Mistakes brought me here

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At fifteen, I ran away from one bad home situation into an even worse one. Within a year, I was introduced to a lifestyle of rampant drug use and went from a straight-A student to a high school drop-out. Sitting by candlelight one night, the electricity having been cut-off due to non-payment again, I sat filling out application forms for dead-end, minimum wage jobs, when a life-changing thought occurred to me like a lightning bolt:

No one is going to save me from this.

I realized in that moment that I had made a mistake – a big one.  My life was falling apart. I was going nowhere very quickly and I knew that no one was going to sweep in and save me.

I had made a mistake, but in accepting that mistake and learning from it – rather than beating myself up emotionally and staying stuck in that situation -I realized that I could change things and, more importantly, I did.

Within a year, I had painfully extricated myself from that life into a better one.  I went back to school, earned a few university degrees and have been on the road to a much better life ever since and I owe all of my success and my happiness to those mistakes I made along the way.

Although painful, I am strangely grateful to them. Without those mistakes, I wouldn’t have worked as hard to get what I want.  Without them, I might not have known what I wanted and I certainly wouldn’t have learned to appreciate all that I have now.

Since becoming an indie author in the past year, I have recently begun to realize that I have been making a whole lot of mistakes along the way.  I have put out four books and have struggled to get them noticed, read, reviewed.  It’s been frustrating and disheartening, but I’ve begun to realize that it’s not because of me or the books, but because of my lack of marketing and distribution channels.  More importantly, I know that I can change that, I can fix it.  And I will.

Mistakes can lead to failure, but viewed in another light – even by dim candlelight- they can also point the way to success and there’s no shame in learning that at any point in our lives.

 

 

 

Redefining “responsible”

“No matter how far you’ve traveled down the wrong path,

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it’s never too late to turn around.”

Memes don’t usually give me pause for thought, but that particular one did.  A few years back, I began to question the path I was taking in my life.  I was happy with most of it – I had a great marriage, happy, healthy kids, a nice house, a decent job.  But there was this constant little voice nagging in the back of my head – what about Hope? what about your stories? 

What about them??

Shortly after the birth of my first, I gave up on my creative writing dreams.  I had had minor success as a teen and in my twenties with publishing my short stories and my poems, but with all the responsibilities of parenthood and a growing family, etc, I figured that writing – particularly all the time spent imagining, daydreaming – was something best left for the carefree (eg: not new parents) and best left out of responsible “adulting.”

Years went by, two more kids arrived and as the responsibilities piled on, my yearning for writing only increased in response. For so long, it had been my outlet, often my only outlet, for dealing with depression – something that has plagued me since adolescence. The writing wasn’t just a hobby, it was my therapy, my coping mechanism.  It was a large part of who I was and how I had handled my depressive thoughts in the past, and without it, I began to realize that not only was I risking falling into it again but I was also denying myself that important outlet of my own self-expression.  I wasn’t allowing myself to be, well, me.

It was just that important and I realized then that I absolutely needed it back in my life.

So, I stopped.  I stopped my journey down that long, arduous (at times, dry and dusty) road of responsible “adulting” and I turned around.  I bought a writing desk, a laptop.  I carved time in my day (sometimes even just 10 – 15 minutes!) and I gave myself permission to write again.  I changed my definition of “responsible parent/adult” to include imagining and daydreaming (and getting more tattoos and listening to new bands and going to concerts again!).

I’ve honestly become a better version of me – even a better parent – for it.  My kids are inspired by it – I’ll never forget my son’s look of amazement when he saw my book on the library bookshelf for the first time. He saw me in a whole new light then, just as I’ve started to see myself in that newer, brighter light too.

This indie author path is a bumpy and uncertain one, for sure, but two years and four books later, I am more than happy to be on it – even if at times I feel completely irresponsible and, not to mention very lost, along the way.

I’m figuring it out as I go.

 

 

 

 

Between the pages, between the cracks

crackI never feel more alone than I do when I am amongst a crowd.  I’ve always felt that way.  Just out of place with everyone and everything. I don’t stress about it too much.  I figure that’s just what makes me who I am.  And I like who I am.  I enjoy my own company, to be really honest.  But at the same time, there are periods when I want to belong, when I want to be accepted, when I want to be a part of something bigger than just me because sometimes being alone a lot becomes, well….lonely.

I have a very small family and I have very few friends.  Being introverted and, for the most part, very private, it takes a lot for me to let others into my tiny circle.  I don’t care for small talk and anything that is popular in the mainstream usually turns me off.  I’ve always been drawn to the outsiders, the outcasts, everything and anything on the fringe.

Maybe that’s why I was always drawn to writing.  It’s the perfect occupation for an outsider, an outcast and can and often is done on the fringes of society, away from the crowd.  I feel most comfortable when I am alone and writing.  But I sure would love for some of that writing to be read at some point.

Rachel Carson so beautifully wrote about the loneliness of creative work:

“If you write what you yourself sincerely think and feel and are interested in, the chances are very high that you will interest other people as well.”

I like to keep that in mind when I am writing – alone in my head, alone at my keyboard, feeling as though I am sending my thoughts and words out to no one.

If I keep at it, maybe people will eventually read my work.  Maybe my words will resonate somewhere, with someone and maybe, just maybe, I might be accepted and finally find my place amongst that crowd.

 

 

 

My book is FREE this weekend!

Screenshot_2019-05-14 Kindle Cover CreatorMy first book, Hope Quest book 1: Blackbird is FREE today (Friday, Feb. 21 thru Sunday, Feb. 23)!!  Get it here.  It is the first part of my Hope Quest trilogy (Hope Quest book 2: The Lightning also available and book 3 still to come this year).  Cosmic and supernatural, the story is set at a music festival with punk kids and musicians, and a strange girl named Hope who speaks in a whisper and occasionally pulls stars from the sky.  The story came to me in a series of dreams when I was 15 and a fun fact, my own fifteen-year-old daughter graces the cover!

I would love for you to check it out and if you like it, please consider leaving me a review on Amazon!  Those reviews are gold for indie writers like me!!